Welcome to the Lucky Mojo Forums!

looking for information on history of love spells & magic

News stories and historical documents relating to the practice of conjure. Brought to you by our sister-site, Southern-Spirits.com
period
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2012 12:51 am
Location: South Africa
Gender:

looking for information on history of love spells & magic

Unread post by period » Thu Dec 13, 2012 4:22 am

Does anyone have links to where i can get information on the history of love spells, love magic and love potions.

User avatar
MaryBee
Forum Moderator
Posts: 1232
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 6:02 pm
Location: Boston, MA
Gender:

Re: looking for information on history of love spells & magic

Unread post by MaryBee » Thu Dec 13, 2012 4:35 am

Hello:
If you read miss cat's online book "Hoodoo in Theory and Practice", you'll learn quite a bit about hoodoo love workings:

http://www.luckymojo.com/hoodoo.html

Pay attention to the Come To Me, Love Me and Reconciliation brands described.

Good luck,
Mary Bee
**********
Mary Bee
Rootworker
AIRR member
Saying "yes" doesn't walk up the mountain.

Vestapol
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu May 09, 2013 7:55 pm

Hoodoo in Theory and Practice by catherine yronwode

Unread post by Vestapol » Mon Jun 10, 2013 8:23 pm

Friends, let me set the context for the point I want to make. I've been reading casually about Hoodoo for years. Mainly tangent to my passion for Blues history. I've visited Hoodoo stores in Atlanta and New Orleans, and done field research on Blues musicians in Anniston, Alabama and the Mississippi Delta. I've carried my precious Mojo Hand since 1994. I'm not new to Hoodoo, but...

I just read the Hoodoo History page at Hoodoo in Theory and Practice by catherine yronwode --HOODOO, CONJURE, and ROOTWORK: AFRICAN AMERICAN FOLK MAGIC (http://www.luckymojo.com/hoodoohistory.html) and gotta say it brought everything together for me. Etymology, geography, historical and folklore research on the many roots of Hoodoo. And it corrected false assumptions I'd never thought to question. Just excellent scholarly synthesis, cat.

So. For the sake of building new knowledge. Who else besides Forum participants has this vision? Is there any one scholarly book that captures all this? Are African-American Folklore scholars like Bernice Johnson Reagon connected to any of the Forum leaders? Is the Smithsonian hip to what's collected in this Forum and its related links?

Cheers,

Doug

User avatar
catherineyronwode
Site Admin
Posts: 14266
Joined: Tue Dec 16, 2008 6:09 pm
Location: Forestville, California
Gender:

Re: Hoodoo in Theory and Practice by catherine yronwode

Unread post by catherineyronwode » Mon Jun 10, 2013 11:01 pm

Doug, i've been pretty much 'buked and scorned by academics for the past 20 years. Some have asked for my time, and a few of those have even cited or quoted me -- but only as a shop-keeper, never as a researcher, because i am of no use to them in academia. You see, i have no letters behind my name and although i have taught 1,850 students (including all the moderators of this forum), i live outside the walled garden of the Universityverse, in the wilds of Autodidactia, where Smithonians never go. In truth, i don't have a high school diploma or even a GED.
catherine yronwode

magicmurphy
Posts: 259
Joined: Mon Apr 15, 2013 6:21 pm
Location: St. Paul, MN
Gender:

Re: Hoodoo in Theory and Practice by catherine yronwode

Unread post by magicmurphy » Tue Jun 11, 2013 10:29 am

It chafes my hide to hear your work has been 'buked and scorned, Ms. cat.That sort of discrimination you've faced as an independent scholar is precisely what I'm fighting against. It's just wrong. And frankly, lettered types are missing the point by not including independent scholars in the circle.

The excuses given by ivory-tower types for not taking indigenous knowledge or experiential knowledge acquisition seriously is simply professional intimidation. And, frankly, jealousy. If an anthropologist or social scientist had the long history of relationships, rapport, and experiences getting to understand the cultural context of a folk practice that you have, they'd be rolling in the fellowship dough. The fact is many social scientists prefer theory to people, which as an anthropologist myself, I have no patience for.

The other issue in the halls of academe is still this idiotic problematic relationship scholars of human culture have with magic. Every culture in the world has its magical practices -- it's nearly a human universal -- but the questions of the discipline still are around why human beings think magically, why we engage in irrational practices, how can modern civilized people still believe in magic, yadda yadda... which, again, is people nervous about experiencing knowledge rather than theorizing safely about it.

I am "lettered" and even my research on a magical religious community raised eyebrows, as well as full knowledge that I was a magical practitioner. It forces even the lettered to fight to be taken seriously. I ended up lucking out -- the lettered folks on my dissertation committee included an astrologer, a gambler, and a Vodou houngan. And they accepted my "insider" knowledge as well as my booklearnin'.

Keep up the research and the writing, Ms. Cat. Your work is expertise. The ivory tower is not as solid as it looks, and eventually, knowledge and good work win out.

Murphy
(Ph.D)
St. Paul, MN

Vestapol
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu May 09, 2013 7:55 pm

Re: Hoodoo in Theory and Practice by catherine yronwode

Unread post by Vestapol » Tue Jun 11, 2013 3:24 pm

catherineyronwode wrote:Doug, i've been pretty much 'buked and scorned by academics for the past 20 years. Some have asked for my time, and a few of those have even cited or quoted me -- but only as a shop-keeper, never as a researcher, because i am of no use to them in academia. You see, i have no letters behind my name and although i have taught 1,850 students (including all the moderators of this forum), i live outside the walled garden of the Universityverse, in the wilds of Autodidactia, where Smithonians never go. In truth, i don't have a high school diploma or even a GED.
There are some scholars who are genuine. Folklorists are a mixed lot, but some are just folks, so to speak. I don't know either of you very well, but intuition tells me Bernice Reagon's spirit is kindred with yours. I bet she would enjoy connecting with you ( you remember Sweet Honey In The Rock?). And she is well-networked with really good people.

Another one who would appreciate your work, tho he's not so deep into African American folklore as he is into Blues history, is Peter Guralnick in Boston. Maybe a connection with him would lead to a network of genuine people who happen to be folklore scholars.

Of course, you may not be looking to make that kind of contribution. I've never tried to publish my field research...I just do it for my own satisfaction. But when I shared it with Peter, he was very encouraging. Ya never know...

Cheers,

Vetsapol

magicmurphy
Posts: 259
Joined: Mon Apr 15, 2013 6:21 pm
Location: St. Paul, MN
Gender:

Re: Hoodoo in Theory and Practice by catherine yronwode

Unread post by magicmurphy » Tue Jun 11, 2013 5:53 pm

Well, Vestapol, maybe we need to start a journal! Then we all can publish. :)

Best,
Murphy
St. Paul, MN

Vestapol
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu May 09, 2013 7:55 pm

Re: Hoodoo in Theory and Practice by catherine yronwode

Unread post by Vestapol » Wed Jun 12, 2013 8:16 pm

There's a Blues musicians' Forum on which I'm active. They'd appreciate knowing about Hoodoo Jukebox and HOODOO, CONJURE, and ROOTWORK: AFRICAN AMERICAN FOLK MAGIC. I wouldn't do this without permission from Catherine and LMForum leaders, but I'd like to cut & paste sections from here to that Forum.

What do you all think?

Vestapol

User avatar
catherineyronwode
Site Admin
Posts: 14266
Joined: Tue Dec 16, 2008 6:09 pm
Location: Forestville, California
Gender:

Re: Hoodoo in Theory and Practice by catherine yronwode

Unread post by catherineyronwode » Thu Jun 13, 2013 9:22 am

"What do you all think?"

"You ALL? "

You are asking "LMForum leaders" -- RANDOM STRANGERS TO YOU -- if THEY think it's okay for you to violate MY copyrights!

Are you NUTS?

I would be grateful if you mention our products and post links to your friends, of course, but you do NOT have my permission to do any "cutting and pasting" of any writing that is copyright by me or the company my husband and i co-own, Lucky Mojo, including this forum. It is AGAINST THE LAW.

This material, and every web page i have ever written and every book i have ever published, is protected by copyright and i will pursue you to the ends of the earth, spit in your face, and watch you die a terrible death if you violate my copyrights.

Thanks for understanding.
catherine yronwode

galeb
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Apr 16, 2013 8:56 pm

Invoking the Gods

Unread post by galeb » Mon Jul 28, 2014 3:55 pm

I understand that in VooDoo the Invoking of the Gods is a common practice. Is this also done in HooDoo? I have seen no indication of such, in the writing on the site.
If it is not understood what Invoking is, it is calling the Gods, (one of them) to take over your body.
It is also common in Wicca as in calling down the moon. Being possessed by the Goddess.

j82
Posts: 2016
Joined: Sun Feb 01, 2009 6:40 pm

Re: Invoking the Gods

Unread post by j82 » Mon Jul 28, 2014 5:37 pm

Hoodoo is based on the Christian Tradition and is worked by like 90% protestant church members. Some catholic brothers and sisters also exist and use the saints and many of the catholic prayers. The invoking of gods is not a practice as i am aware in hoodoo. It is not uncommon to work with spirits and to pay for their help, ask for their help etc. Note that Voodoo and Hoodoo are two different practices, unfortunately they get mixed together because 1. African Americans practice both in different parts of the world, 2. they sound the same. Some similarities exist such as use in candles or herbs and stuff but those carry on in most folk traditions that exist in the world. In hoodoo we rely on God to answer our prayer and the spirits of the root to work with our intention.

User avatar
Miss Aida
Posts: 16272
Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2011 3:50 pm
Gender:

Re: Invoking the Gods

Unread post by Miss Aida » Tue Jul 29, 2014 1:00 pm

Hello, galeb ,
Please be mindful of where you post questions.
This is not the appropriate thread.
As j82 has pointed out, Voodoo and Hoodoo are 2 different practices. We discuss Hoodoo on this forum.
I suggest that you read this webpage that Miss cat has written: http://www.luckymojo.com/hoodoohistory.html
This topic is now being moved to the appropriate subforum
Take care

galeb
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Apr 16, 2013 8:56 pm

Re: Invoking the Gods

Unread post by galeb » Mon Aug 25, 2014 2:14 pm

j82 wrote:Hoodoo is based on the Christian Tradition and is worked by like 90% protestant church members. Some catholic brothers and sisters also exist and use the saints and many of the catholic prayers. The invoking of gods is not a practice as i am aware in hoodoo. It is not uncommon to work with spirits and to pay for their help, ask for their help etc. Note that Voodoo and Hoodoo are two different practices, unfortunately they get mixed together because 1. African Americans practice both in different parts of the world, 2. they sound the same. Some similarities exist such as use in candles or herbs and stuff but those carry on in most folk traditions that exist in the world. In hoodoo we rely on God to answer our prayer and the spirits of the root to work with our intention.
Thank you, I was just curious, being some of the other forms of magic does so, and I knew that prayers to God was used. Thanks for the clarification.
P.S. I am well aware that Hoodoo and Voodoo are two entirely different practices.

Herb-Magic.com
Post Reply

Return to “Hoodoo in History / Hoodoo in the News”