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Southern Spirits Web Site News

News stories and historical documents relating to the practice of conjure. Brought to you by our sister-site, Southern-Spirits.com

Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby catherineyronwode » Tue Dec 21, 2010 9:35 pm

Southern Spirits is a web site i have created to contain historical and documentary material about hoodoo from the 19th and 20th centuries. Among the many articles are a number of accounts of hoodoo by ex-slaves, as well as newspaper articles from the past, and interviews with people who mentioned their use of rootwork.

New pages at Southern Spirits this week include:

An illustrated documentary article on hoodoo in a Baptist Church in New Jersey in 1900:
http://www.southern-spirits.com/anon-ba ... rt-nj.html

An account of which hoodoo supplies were being sold in Brooklyn, New York in 1925:
http://www.southern-spirits.com/anon-vo ... lyn-2.html

The obituary of a Louisiana French Creole root doctor and traiteur (healer) from 1965:
http://www.southern-spirits.com/fonteno ... tuary.html

Enjoy!
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby jwmcclin » Wed Dec 22, 2010 5:30 pm

Thanks cat, this is very good information.
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby Miss Tammie Lee » Wed Dec 22, 2010 6:41 pm

These were wonderful reading Miss Cat, and I really liked reading about Dr. Jack!
Thank you.
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby shaitan » Wed Jan 19, 2011 1:52 pm

yes I agree very good info thanks cat
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby Joseph Magnuson » Thu Jan 20, 2011 7:50 am

I am thrilled at the new additions to the Southern Spirits site! I can;t wait to get home from work and read those up! Thank you for the heads-up, Cat!

-Joseph
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby Zarzamora » Sat Apr 02, 2011 9:28 am

Exciting :)
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby AnddieUS » Mon Aug 08, 2011 8:56 am

Thanks for this Ms. Cat! Great information!
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby candlemagician » Tue Jan 24, 2012 3:54 pm

It is so helpful to read and understand in context the background , while we also study and work through the correspondence course. This is great even for those not taking the course.

Thanks Ms. Cat!
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby catherineyronwode » Fri Jan 04, 2013 11:10 pm

I have added some new genealogical information about the Bichon family to the already extant Southern Spirits page that describes the Bichon Drug Store, a.k.a. Bichon's Pharmacy in Houston, formerly one of the best hoodoo shops in the country. If any of you have photos of the Bichon Drug Store, please let me know:

Here is the (so far pictureless) web page URL:

http://www.southern-spirits.com/byrd-bi ... uston.html

Enjoy!
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby Cali_mojogirl » Mon Nov 04, 2013 8:33 pm

Man, what a place! I can just hear the jook joint roaring in the background somewhere. And I love Syd Byrd's snappy writing --sounds like the introduction to a great movie (narrated by Morgan Freeman, of course lol).

I bet the original labels for the Bichon's proprietary hoodoo formulations would be quite the collector's items now. Wonder what they looked like.

Thank you Miss Cat for the intriguing research. Perhaps descendants of the Bichon's (lucky ;) ) 7 children will step forward with pics of the old family shop, and/or other memorabilia. That would be great.



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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby catherineyronwode » Mon Nov 04, 2013 11:06 pm

You're welcome. It is worth noting that although i quoted some material about the 400 block of Milan street, which Sig Syrd described as "biracial," Bichon's Pharmacy itself was located in the 300 block (312, to be exact) in the area known as Milamstrasse. Strasse is German (and Yiddish) for street, and probably referred to an area where Jewish shopkeepers served a black clientele.

Also note that Sig Byrd, despite being a white journalist, quite accurately described Bichon's as selling hoodoo goods, but that a later reminiscence by an outsider who remembered the place, which i also printed on the page, called it a "voodoo" shop. This is typical of white people -- calling hoodoo Voodoo. Sig Byrd knew better.

I also find this piece of interest when countering the latest internet meme, propagated by white pagans since around 2010, that "it was never called hoodoo." Yeah, right. In Houston, Texas, it was definitely called hoodoo.

And, by the way, the article now has four pictures -- alas, none yet of the drugstore or of the Bichon family, but at least some of their gravestones.

http://www.southern-spirits.com/byrd-bi ... uston.html


http
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby Joseph Magnuson » Fri Nov 08, 2013 8:09 am

Thank you for the updates, Cat. It is great to be notified in these forums so I can go straight over and read the added articles. Keep it up!
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby catherineyronwode » Fri Jan 03, 2014 9:28 pm

I have just finished the commentary on a new Southern Spirits web page. Check it out -- conjuration and goophering in Missouri, circa 1840, as narrated by the ex-slave William Wells Brown. Read all about Dinkie the Goopher King in

DINKIE, A CONJURE DOCTOR IN MISSOURI by William Wells Brown, 1880,
extracted from MY SOUTHERN HOME: OR, THE SOUTH AND ITS PEOPLE.

http://www.southern-spirits.com/brown-dinkie.html
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby Darrinwow » Sun Apr 20, 2014 6:01 am

Hello All....

I'm a new member to this forum, but not new to the teachings of miss cat. I have to say that I was one of the folks that believed Appalachian Folk Magic influenced Hoodoo, and luckily after researching the information via HOODOO IN THEORY AND PRACTICE, I see that is historically not the case.

I live in Northern Arkansas, and of course Ozark Folk Magic was established here many years ago, it seems to have since faded into history.

A question to the forum, would Ozark Folk Magic also be influenced by Hoodoo practices, and not the opposite like some believe?

My great-grandfather, James Chadwick, used the Bible to heal folks, and stop bleeding. I'm wondering if he learned other workings from the African American folks that worked the cotton fields, as they were all based in the eastern flat land region of Arkansas. His wife was also 1/2 Cherokee so there is some influence there as well. He died and never passed on his knowledge to any of the family. They are all pretty much right-wing Bible folks and they like to keep his "workings" under the table. ;)

Funny how much we learn if we actually research the History, yes?

Happy Easter!
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Re: Southern Spirits Web Site News

Unread postby catherineyronwode » Sat Aug 16, 2014 9:32 pm

Darrin,

Stopping bleeding wth a Bible verse, a rhymed enchantment, or a spoken formula is a fairly European class of work, found in Norse trolldom, Germanic folks magic, etc. I would consider it one of the instances in which back Americans incorporated white folk magic rather than the other way around.

I think the real problem wit those who claim that Appalachians / Irish-Americans / Scots-Irish Americans / Ozark folks "influenced hoodoo" or, as some have claimed, "originated hoodoo," is that they really do not know what hoodoo is and how different it is, on the whole, from European folk magic. They see a couple of similarities and assume that hoodoo is just that. Hoodoo is a different way of working, a black American way of working. Hoodoo reoot doctors have indeed incorporated a number of European and Jewish concepts and spell-families into their work, but the opposite is rarely the case. You will not find very many white Americans actually practicing hoodoo, despite their claims on the internet.

For instance, chewing hot spicy roots and seeds and then either holding them in your mouth or under your tongue while talking (which anthropologists would call a form of ordeal-magic) or spitting out your hot-spicy saliva after chewing them for a target to step in (which anthropologists would call a form of foot-track magic) is not a big deal in Appalachian folk magic, but it is in African American folk magic. Today a person came to this forum and asked about putting Cardamom Seeds in a doll baby. I was non-plussed. You chew them. Cardamom is in the Ginger family, like Little John to Chew and Grains of Paradise Seeds, all of which are also chewed in hoodoo. The querent had no grasp on the larger context of how hoodoo works, and just wanted to use Cardamom Seeds to stuff a love-doll, working in the European tradition. There's nothing wrong with that, but the topic here is hoodoo, and there are other forums where European and European-American folk magic are the central focus of discussion.
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